Slow Cooker Red Cabbage

My Grandma’s Slow Cooker Red Cabbage

Slow Cooker Red Cabbage

My Grandmother was a lively, determined and courageous woman with great style. She kept a beautiful house, and was also a great cook. Not necessarily exquisite cuisine, but more of an everyday cook. Also super fast and very inventive.

She didn’t own a crock pot in those days, but I do remember her slow cooking on a Paraffin Stove.
Slow cooked Red Cabbage with apples and spices, just the smell reminds me of her and my mother who has cooked the same recipe for over half a century. To me this is home cooking.
I don’t make it very often but when the temperature drops it’s just what you need, home made cozy comfort food.


Serves : 6-8
INGREDIENTS:

Slow Cooker Red Cabbage

Slow Cooker Red Cabbage

2 tbsp. butter
1 medium red cabbage, shredded on a mandoline or cut thinly with  knife
1 medium onion, peeled and chopped fine
2 medium apples, peeled and diced small
1/4 tsp. ground dry ginger
1/4 tsp. ground cloves
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ground all spice
2 bay leaves
1/4 Cup  sugar
1/4 Cup apple cider vinegar
1 1/4 Cups water
1/4 Cup red wine (I use alcohol free wine so that works fine too) or more water

Slow Cooker Red Cabbage

METHOD:
This couldn’t be easier.
Place all the ingredients in the slow cooker, toss very well.
Set the cooker to high and put on the lid. Leave to cook for 5 to 6 hours, depending how hot your slow cooker is. The water amount is just right for my slow cooker, but half way through cooking check to see how you are doing on the liquid, it shouldn’t get dry. Add a little water if necessary.
This is one of the few vegetable dishes that you want well cooked.

Enjoy!

Myra XO

Jerusalem Artichoke au jus with Pancetta, Garlic and Thyme

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Let’s talk about the Jerusalem Artichoke. This knobby little tuber with the resemblance of ginger is an (underestimated) root vegetable.

Jerusalem Artichokes are packed with inulin, a long chain of fructose molecules that us humans have a hard time breaking down.  So that makes it a fibre rather than a starch and has hardly any effect on blood sugar levels. Inulin is also a  prebiotic that stimulates the growth of beneficial bacteria in the digestive tract that in turn aids digestion and lowers blood pressure and cholesterol.

There has been some controversy lately on the internet about this vegetable  whether it’s bad for the tummy, or if it may cause gas or some intolerance. I have to say that I have never had any trouble. Some peope say it’s because of the skin so just peel them to be save.

And although the side effects such as gas only occurs in a small percentage of people, it’s best to know whether you’re one of those people before serving them at your next dinner party. Just try a few and see. They are really worth it.

They are also very healthy, with high fibre, high potassium, good for lowering cholesterol and they boost the immune system. So let’s stay positive and give them a change. They have a delicious nutty flavour and also really do have an artichoke flavour. They are velvety soft on the inside, perfect for fall dishes.

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Ingredients;

1 lb. Jerusalem Artichoke

1 lemon

1 tbsp. butter

1 tbsp. Olive Oil

2 tsp. very good quality Beef Broth Concentrate

1/4  C. hot water

2 oz. chopped Pancetta

1 garlic clove, peeled and chopped fine

a few sprigs of thyme

1 tsp. Thyme leafs for decorating

Method;

Halve the lemon, squeeze out the juice and put the juice  into a bowl with plenty of cold water. Peel the jerusalem artichokes, cut away the ends, then cut into two if very long. then drop them into the lemon water to stop them from discolouring.

Heat  the oil and half the butter in a large sauté pan or deep frying pan over a medium heat. Drain the jerusalem artichokes, dry them well, add to the pan. Fry them for 5 minutes until they get a bit golden brown. Add the stock concentrate, move the pan around very gently and add the water, not all at once, safe some for later. Tuck in the thyme sprigs. Partially cover the pan with a lid and leave to cook for  15 minutes until just tender. After ten minutes check and see if you need to add water. Move the jerusalem artichoke around gently so they all get covered in the jus. Be careful not to break the topinambur since they are quite fragile. By the end of cooking the liquid should have evaporated and you should be left with a sticky kind of coating on the chokes.

In an other large frying pan add the rest of the butter and cook the pancetta until just turning golden. Add the garlic and leave to cook for a few seconds. Add to the pan of Jeruslaem Artichokes  and gently toss everything together. Sprinkle over the remaining thyme leafs.

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Not quite what you’re looking for? How about Shredded Brussels Sprouts with Maple glazed Hazelnuts and Bacon

Rice Paper Rolls with peanut dipping sauce

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Rice paper rolls are really easy to make, they may look a bit intimidating, but the trick is not to soak them too long. Let the rice paper soften without going soggy, they tear apart easily. The vegetable filling is also moist and will give the roll enough pliability once you’re rolling them up. They keep a day in the fridge but really are best when eaten the same day. They are really great for lunch or a summer dinner when it is too hot outside to cook. You can make them in the morning and keep them in the fridge for when you are ready to eat them. I added the beet root which may be a bit unconventional, for the sweetness it gives the rolls and of course the beautiful color.

Serves: 3-4
Ingredients for the rice rolls:
    • 10 rice papers or more
    • 1 cup cooked quinoa
    • 1 cucumber, peeled, deseeded and cut in to strips
    • ½ cup sprouts
    • 2 carrots cut to thin strips
    • some Coriander leafs
    • 1 avocado, peeled and cut in to strips
  • 1 beet root, peeled and grated fine
Ingredients for the peanut sauce:
    • 1/4 C. peanut butter
    • 1 tbsp. soy sauce
    • 1/2 tsp. coriander powder
    • 1/4 tsp. cumin
    • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
    • 1 tsp. Sambal Oelek or Sriracha sauce, or more if you can take it
  • 3/4 – 1 C. coconut milk
Method:
For the peanut sauce, just mix all the ingredients. You can serve it as is, or heat it up a little bit. It will thicken however.
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For the rice rolls, arrange all the ingredients for the stuffing and prepare to make the rolls. Take a shallow bowl with warm water.
Soak the rice paper sheets for about 15 seconds and let it get pliable. Carefully take it out and lay it on a moist kitchen towel (I put them on a plastic cutting board, but then you have to work quit fast), and stuff all the vegetables. Top with Quinoa and roll  tightly. Make sure not to over stuff it. Roll like you would a traditional spring roll or a wrap.After you roll it, put them on a plate that has been rubbed with a little bit of vegetable oil. Cover them loosely  with a wet paper towel or kitchen towel. Cut them in half when you are ready to eat. Serve them with the peanut sauce. If you are going to keep them in the fridge all day until evening , cover them with cling film which has been sprayed with cooking oil.
Enjoy!
Myra Xo